Miso Soup Recipe

Miso Soup 3

This miso soup recipe comes from my friend Mayumi. Mayumi lives on the same island I do in Vanuatu and says this soup is great for hangovers. I find it to be very comforting and love the flavor. It is very easy to make and very tasty and has only five ingredients.

Miso paste comes in red or white. This soup uses white miso paste. Miso paste is traditional Japanese seasoning that is made from fermenting soy beans with salt and the fungus Aspergillus oryzae, known in Japanese as kōjikin. It sometimes contains barley, rice and Dashi. White miso is made with soy beans and rice. The red one has barley and other cereals.

Miso is considered to help you release toxins. It is also very rich in protein, minerals such as Calcium and vitamin B12.

This contains Dashi which is a fish and kelp stock powder but it can be omitted in order to make this vegetarian and/or vegan. Make sure the miso paste has no dashi in it.

Mayumi’s greatest recommendation for this soup is that you do not let it boil furiously. You need to simmer it all along but watch that it does not go into a full boil.

You will need some specific Japanese ingredients for this soup. You can purchase them from the carousel below if you like. This comes directly from Amazon and will not cost you anymore but I will get a small commission that helps me support the website.

This is what you are going to need for this wonderful and easy Miso soup recipe:

Serves six
10 oz. of firm tofu
4 cups water
1 envelope Dashi powdered fish stock
¼ cup dry Wakame seaweed
3 TBS white Miso paste
Chopped green onion

If the tofu is not fresh – if it comes packaged – remove it from the package and soak it in a bowl of cold water for about 5 to 10 minutes. Cube the tofu carefully and drain it.

Add the water to a pot and start simmering at medium heat. Add the dashi powder and dilute well. Add the tofu and the sea weed. Stir and allow simmering for a few minutes until the sea weed expands and the tofu heats up.

Place the miso paste into a colander and dip it into the soup. Dissolve the paste using a spoon. Do not add the miso directly into the soup. Allow the soup to simmer slowly for 3 to 4 minutes.

Turn off the heat and add the spring onion. Serve and enjoy.

CALORIES 51.67; FAT 13.48 grs (sat 0.51; mono 0.68; poly 1.13); PROTEIN 4.97 grs ; FIBER 0.90 grs; CARBS 3.37 grs; CHOLESTEROL 0.00 mg; IRON 1.04 mg; SODIUM 359.86 mg; CALCIUM 109.61 mg

Print the Miso Soup Recipe Here

My name is Mary Ann Allen and I am here to help you get organized so you can save money on groceries and feed your family healthy, nutritious food. My multi-cultural cooking background comes from being born in the US and raised in Bolivia. I have 5 kids and own around 400 cook books. I absolutely love to cook!


  • April 21, 2014

    Rosa @HHR

    Love miso! I usually make my dashi with dried konbu & dried fish instead of powder. very soothing!

  • April 21, 2014


    Thank you Rosa! Great tip! I always appreciate you stopping by! Have a great week!
    Mary Ann

  • April 22, 2014


    Thanks Mary Ann, Thank you for the fun time ! I didn’t know that you can buy Japanese food from Amazon.com. Great to know !!! I hope they will send to Vanuatu ! Chao.

  • April 22, 2014


    Hi Rosa, Yes dried Kombu(Sea weed) or/and dried Bonito fish flake are the proper Japanese way if you can find them. For us lazy & busy Japanese we use Dashi ha ha ha ha ha 🙂 You are very good !

  • April 22, 2014


    It certainly was a lot of fun! Thank you very much for the recipe!
    Mary Ann

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